3 Habits You’re Doing Every Day That Damage Your Teeth – A Perth Guide

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Perhaps you’ve been born and raised with sound oral hygiene drilled into you from a young age.

 

If so, you’re lucky.

 

Worldwide, bad dental habits are leading to a slew of problems. In Australia, poor oral hygiene is surprisingly widespread.

 

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare reported back from an AIHW workshop centred on dental statistics with some sobering findings.

 

Here’s what they found:

 

  • Only 1 in 2 Australians had seen a dentist over the previous 12 months (2014-2015)
  • 3 in 10 Australian adults aged 25 to 44 have an untreated oral health issue
  • 1 in 25 adults Australians have no natural teeth whatsoever
  • Almost 1 in 2 kids aged 5 to 10 have experienced decay in their baby teeth and 1 in 4 kids having untreated tooth decay
  • 3 in 10 Australians staved off visiting the dentist for financial reasons
  • Over 70,000 hospitalisations occurred due to preventable dental conditions (2016-2017)
  • The problems caused by bad dental habits cost patients $10.2 billion (2016-2017)

 

On the plus side, 7 in 10 children in Australia aged 5 to 14 brush their teeth twice a day.

 

How then, can this early education in good dental practice be extended into adulthood?

 

Avoiding these three ruinous habits can go a long way towards making sure you’re not among those statistics, helping you keep your teeth well into retirement.

 

  • Poor Technique When Brushing Your Teeth
  • Eating Too Much of The Wrong Food
  • Opening Bottles with Your Teeth

Poor Technique When Brushing Your Teeth

You might think that simply brushing your teeth is all that’s required, but you’d be mistaken.

 

Firstly, you need to make sure you don’t go over the top in terms of frequency or aggressiveness. Brushing twice daily is the sweet spot. Avoid using excessive force, or you could end up damaging your gums.

 

If you’re in any element of doubt and need a refresher, follow these simple steps:

 

  • Gently brush with short strokes and keep the brush angled at 45 degrees
  • Start with the outer surface of the upper teeth then work down to the same area of the lower teeth
  • Move on to the inner surface and round out with the chewing surface
  • Brush your tongue even if it initially feels strange — You’ll soon get used to it
  • Pay attention to all the awkward areas of your mouth to ensure a deep clean that would make your dentist proud

Eating Too Much of The Wrong Food

You can easily undo the good work of brushing your teeth properly with a poor diet heavy on sweet foods.

 

Not only do sweet foods cause plaque, tooth decay and gum problems, they can also strip away the enamel on your teeth.

 

Candy, chips and soda are all best consumed in moderation.

 

Bread is surprisingly bad if you eat too much of it. Even fruits can be bad for the teeth due to the natural sugars they contain. Oranges, lemons, and grapefruits are particularly bad news when eaten to excess.

 

Chewing ice or anything else hard is also an easy way to damage the enamel so go easy on all the above.

Opening Bottles with Your Teeth

While this might seem like a statement of the obvious, avoid the party trick of opening your bottle with your teeth.

 

You can cause both internal and external problems not to mention running the risk of cutting your mouth. You won’t look so cool after you break a few teeth doing this stunt.

 

Grab a bottle opener and avoid becoming one of those dental statistics.

Why Should You Care About Poor Dental Hygiene?

The primary benefits of looking after your teeth include boasting a far more attractive smile, avoiding the pain caused by decay and slashing the amount you’ll need to spend on fixing any damage.

 

Beyond this, you can also reduce the chance of developing a range of health issues from gum problems to cardiovascular disease.

 

If you want any advice on improving your dental hygiene , please contact Dentist in Perth today.

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